Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Butterflies of the Maypop

The beautiful Maypop flower.

The Maypop (Passiflora incarnata, that I recently wrote about in this postis the primary host plant for a few butterfly species in North America. Growing up in South Florida, I distinctly remember both the passion flowers (although I still am not sure if they were Passiflora incarnata or other closely related species that need the more tropical weather of southern Florida) and a few of these butterflies. But I did not know how closely their lives intertwined. I am always amazed at the beauty of God's creation as seen in the wide variety of plant and animal species.

Gulf Fritillary (aka Passion Butterfly)
Agraulis vanillae
Uses the Maypop for food (leaves) as a caterpillar and food (nectar) as adults.


Gulf Fritillary (aka Passion Butterfly), Agraulis vanillae, on a Maypop flower.






Variegated Fritillary
Eutoieta claudia

Uses the Maypop for food (leaves) as a caterpillar and food (nectar) as adults.







Banded Hairstreak
Satyrium calanus
Uses the Maypop for food (nectar) as an adult.






Red-Banded Hairstreak
Calycopis cecrops
Uses the Maypop for food (nectar) as an adult.



Julia Butterfly (aka Julia Heliconian, The Flame)
Dryas iulia
Uses the Maypop for food (leaves) as a caterpillar.




Zebra Heliconian (aka Zebra Longwing)
Heliconius charithonia
Uses the Maypop for food (leaves) as a caterpillar.


The Zebra Heliconian, official butterfly of the state of Florida.


Mexican Silverspot
Dione moneta
Uses the Maypop for food (leaves) as a caterpillar.










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